/page/2
jessejaimes:

shailenewoodleys:

fuckyeahzarry:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 



THANK YOU. This entire metaphor is supposed to be just that, a metaphor. And I for one think its awesome!

jessejaimes:

shailenewoodleys:

fuckyeahzarry:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

THANK YOU. This entire metaphor is supposed to be just that, a metaphor. And I for one think its awesome!

(via hi-)

aplacethatdoesntknowmyname:

You have a very brutal combat scene together. So, Jeremy, how hard was it not to hurt Scarlett at all? [x]

(via lostinscarlett)

ningunlugar:

Annie Atkins created the graphics Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel.

"Last year I spent a very snowy winter on the German-Polish border, as the lead graphic designer on Wes Anderson’s Grand Budapest Hotel. Working with Wes and his production designer Adam Stockhausen, we created all the graphic props and set-pieces for the State of Zubrowka – a fictitious European country set between the Wars. After we finished shooting I came back to Dublin and worked remotely with Wes on the poster and the titles."

arbolesdeplasticos:

"If you don’t believe we can do it, you can’t believe in anything." - Manuel Pellegrini

arbolesdeplasticos:

"If you don’t believe we can do it, you can’t believe in anything." - Manuel Pellegrini

joe-hartfans:

Joe Hart’s 100 clean sheets

(Source: marcohan, via hi-)

afootballreport:

Words Unsaid: Looking at the Europa League Theme

By David Rudin

At some point in the early 1990s, back when wins at the World Cup were still worth two points, goalkeepers were still allowed to handle back passes, and UEFA was still headquartered in a squat concrete complex on Bern’s Jupiterstrasse, the powers that be in European football gathered together and decided that a footballing competition wasn’t really a footballing competition without an anthem. 

For the Champions League’s 1992 debut, UEFA therefore commissioned Tony Britten to pen its anthem. The English composer set the French, German, and English words for “champions” to the tune of Handel’s “Zadok the Priest.” This grandiose mélange was then recorded by London’s Philharmonic Orchestra and the Academy of St Martin in the Fields Chorus. Thus, “Champions League” was born.

Like a national anthem, “Champions League” is more flattering than honest. It sidesteps the competition’s lack of history with a score that predates the invention of association football by 140 years. Lyrics like “The best teams/The Champions” gloss over the inclusion of multiple entrants per nation. The London Philharmonic Orchestra’s cultural cachet helps to mitigate UEFA’s crass commercialism. Tony Britten’s anthem is UEFA’s description of the Champions League: prestigious, rich in history, and exclusive.

The Europa League is a footballing competition and, as a footballing competition, it must have an anthem. 

But how do you describe the Europa League?

Read More

wannabepoesie:

andropomorphine:

americankopite:

Dude, I don’t know if anybody told you, but we have this little thing called physics.

I had to reblog this again…

Oh

wannabepoesie:

andropomorphine:

americankopite:

Dude, I don’t know if anybody told you, but we have this little thing called physics.

I had to reblog this again…

Oh

(Source: yodiscrepo, via hi-)

nba:

Nick Young of the Los Angeles Lakers during the game against the Los Angeles Clippers at Staples Center on April 6, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.
(Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE via Getty Images)

nba:

Nick Young of the Los Angeles Lakers during the game against the Los Angeles Clippers at Staples Center on April 6, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.

(Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE via Getty Images)

kicktv:

Air Jürgen!

kicktv:

Air Jürgen!

(Source: cutiebarb)

jessejaimes:

shailenewoodleys:

fuckyeahzarry:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 



THANK YOU. This entire metaphor is supposed to be just that, a metaphor. And I for one think its awesome!

jessejaimes:

shailenewoodleys:

fuckyeahzarry:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

THANK YOU. This entire metaphor is supposed to be just that, a metaphor. And I for one think its awesome!

(via hi-)

aplacethatdoesntknowmyname:

You have a very brutal combat scene together. So, Jeremy, how hard was it not to hurt Scarlett at all? [x]

(via lostinscarlett)

ningunlugar:

Annie Atkins created the graphics Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel.

"Last year I spent a very snowy winter on the German-Polish border, as the lead graphic designer on Wes Anderson’s Grand Budapest Hotel. Working with Wes and his production designer Adam Stockhausen, we created all the graphic props and set-pieces for the State of Zubrowka – a fictitious European country set between the Wars. After we finished shooting I came back to Dublin and worked remotely with Wes on the poster and the titles."

arbolesdeplasticos:

"If you don’t believe we can do it, you can’t believe in anything." - Manuel Pellegrini

arbolesdeplasticos:

"If you don’t believe we can do it, you can’t believe in anything." - Manuel Pellegrini

joe-hartfans:

Joe Hart’s 100 clean sheets

(Source: voguelustys, via dragana-d)

(Source: marcohan, via hi-)

afootballreport:

Words Unsaid: Looking at the Europa League Theme

By David Rudin

At some point in the early 1990s, back when wins at the World Cup were still worth two points, goalkeepers were still allowed to handle back passes, and UEFA was still headquartered in a squat concrete complex on Bern’s Jupiterstrasse, the powers that be in European football gathered together and decided that a footballing competition wasn’t really a footballing competition without an anthem. 

For the Champions League’s 1992 debut, UEFA therefore commissioned Tony Britten to pen its anthem. The English composer set the French, German, and English words for “champions” to the tune of Handel’s “Zadok the Priest.” This grandiose mélange was then recorded by London’s Philharmonic Orchestra and the Academy of St Martin in the Fields Chorus. Thus, “Champions League” was born.

Like a national anthem, “Champions League” is more flattering than honest. It sidesteps the competition’s lack of history with a score that predates the invention of association football by 140 years. Lyrics like “The best teams/The Champions” gloss over the inclusion of multiple entrants per nation. The London Philharmonic Orchestra’s cultural cachet helps to mitigate UEFA’s crass commercialism. Tony Britten’s anthem is UEFA’s description of the Champions League: prestigious, rich in history, and exclusive.

The Europa League is a footballing competition and, as a footballing competition, it must have an anthem. 

But how do you describe the Europa League?

Read More

wannabepoesie:

andropomorphine:

americankopite:

Dude, I don’t know if anybody told you, but we have this little thing called physics.

I had to reblog this again…

Oh

wannabepoesie:

andropomorphine:

americankopite:

Dude, I don’t know if anybody told you, but we have this little thing called physics.

I had to reblog this again…

Oh

(Source: yodiscrepo, via hi-)

nba:

Nick Young of the Los Angeles Lakers during the game against the Los Angeles Clippers at Staples Center on April 6, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.
(Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE via Getty Images)

nba:

Nick Young of the Los Angeles Lakers during the game against the Los Angeles Clippers at Staples Center on April 6, 2014 in Los Angeles, California.

(Photo by Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE via Getty Images)

kicktv:

Air Jürgen!

kicktv:

Air Jürgen!

celebritiessmoking:

Lindsay Lohan

celebritiessmoking:

Lindsay Lohan

About:

Mapolius. Self-Crowned King. Elya Marzuqi. Authenticity.

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